Category: Medical / Clinical Medicine

A Clinical Guide to Epileptic Syndromes and their Treatment

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A disorder which affects 4 percent of children and 1-2 percent of the general population, epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. The original edition of C.P. Panayiotopoulos’ guide proved to be the only one of its kind, covering many important aspects of diagnosis and treatment. Due to the continued advances being made in the subject, a second edition is now due. The text includes detailed diagnostics, concise descriptions of syndromes, a wealth of practical tips, and is supported by useful tables to enable clear diagnoses.

Building on the sell-out success of the first edition this thorough revision reflects the latest report of the ILAE classification core group and the significant progress made in the diagnosis, classification and treatment of the epilepsies.

This new edition is indispensable reading for all those who care for patients with epileptic seizures.

Neuropathology

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Increasing specialisation in pathology reflects the progressive changes in medical practise. The advent of a specialist with a new interest in a hospital or clinic may present the pathologist with a need to extend his or her knowledge to be able to work closely with the clinical practi tioner in order to provide adequate clinical care. Some sub-specialisations are long established, such a one is neu ropathology. However, an exclusive specialist practise is generally con fined to neurosurgical centres and much neuropathology is of necessity, executed by geneni.l pathologists. The areas covered by this volume are those which are commonly managed by the generalist. Professor Adams’ account of how the skull and brain should be examined here will give confidence to many by defining a good technique and the careful description of various kinds of vascular injury lesions resulting from raised intracranial pressure will help to clarify repeated difficulty. More subtle forms of damage are also considered in detail. Professor Weller provides a detailed account of how the central nervous system may be examined in a way which permits all of us to prepare material which will allow adequate investigation of central nervous system disease and the proper examination of peripheral nerves. This chapter will become a “handbook” and will be of interest to those in training and established practitioners. Muscle biopsy is also dealt with; this is an area of investigative concern for many gener alists. The role of that singular neuropathological technique is very clearly emphasized.

Pediatric Neuropathology

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Neuropathology is the foundation for understanding developmental neuroscience, pediatric neurology, and neurosurgery, but until now a comprehensive volume covering all aspects of pediatric neuropathology was not available. This atlas is thus a unique, comprehensive reference providing the fundamentals of developmental brain disorders of the nervous system that can affect fetuses, infants and young children, as well as the essentials of diagnosis in developmental brain pathology and neuroimaging. With an emphasis on the characteristic morphology and a concise summary of clinical features, pathogenesis, and genetics, the generously illustrated atlas presents more than 100 disorders, including the common diseases of the peripheral nervous system as well as genetically determined metabolic and storage diseases. This compilation is a valuable resource for pathologists, pediatric neurologists and neurosurgeons, geneticists, neonatologists, radiologists, and pediatricians.

Neuropathology

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In commissioning this volume of Current Topics in Pathology, the editor of the series, Prof. Sir Colin Berry, asked me to produce something “which is aimed at the general pathologist but from the point of view of the neuropathologist who knows what is not being done well”. This was easier said than done. Many aspects of neuropathology are encountered only infrequently in general pathology and are best dealt with by re ferral of material to a specialist unit. Others need more extensive investigation than is practicable in a general pathology setting. Yet neurological disorders in general are common and are encountered by general histopathologists, paediatric and forensic pathologists on a daily basis, particularly in autopsy practice. In inviting contributions to this volume of Current Topics in Pathology, I therefore biased the con tents towards disorders in which the conduct of the autopsy and the initial approach to neuropathological investigation are of critical importance in making the diagnosis. The authors all have a wealth of experience and expertise and I believe that this is reflected in their approach, which is both personal and practical. Indeed, the emphasis in this book is very much on the provision of practical advice. All of the chapters contain guidelines on the conduct of autopsies as well as infor mation on the macroscopic and basic histological assessment of the nervous system in the relevant disorders.

Intra-Operative Neuropathology for the Non-Neuropathologist

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This volume acquaints the non-neuropathologist with the advantages of clinical-radiologic-pathologic correlation in neuropathology specimens, particularly in the intra-operative consultation. As a good cytology preparation can add to, or even supply in isolation, a diagnosis, this volume covers the enormous and sometimes insurmountable artifacts involved with freezing tissue, especially central nervous system tissue. The text presents how to perform, and stain the cytologic preparations, and how to interpret them. The advantages and disadvantages of both frozen sections and cytologic preparations of various kinds are discussed. The presentation and format is very visual with diagrams, tables, with many figures including pearls and pitfalls and therefore easy reading.

An introductory chapter presents the pros and cons of cytology, the advantages and disadvantages of frozen sections, and the artifacts in both. Also included is an argument for knowing what the scans reveal, and the impact of relevant patient history. The volume uses a case-based approach to show correlation between scan, history, frozen section and cytologic preparations.

With the combination of extensive correlation of scans, cytology, and frozen section with differential diagnosis, and analysis of the information crucial to the neurosurgeon in a case-based approach and with a special chapter written by a neuroradiologist, this volume is unique in presentation and utility and will be of great value to the trainee in pathology (residents/fellows), and practicing pathologists who include neuropathology in their practice, but do not have formal fellowship training in neuropathology.

Neuropathology Review

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The scope of neuropathology continues to expand and the ever-increasing amount of information to assimilate and master can be daunting. Neuropathology Review, Second Edition summarizes in simple outline form the essentials of neuropathology. It has been updated to reflect the newest information and ideas in this constantly changing field.

Textbook of Neuropathology

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Textbook of Neuropathology, Second Edition covers some of the significant advances in understanding the theoretical and experimental aspects of neuropathology. Neuropathology is the study of the nervous tissue in disease and the determination of deviations of its structures from the normal.
This edition is composed of 13 chapters, and begins with the description of the chemical changes occurring in the cell through autolysis and fixation. The subsequent chapters are devoted to studies on better understanding of the vitamin deficiencies, the discovery of the sulfonamides and their contribution to the therapy of meningitis, and the different forms of shock treatment applied to selected cases of neurosis and psychosis. The remaining chapters explore the contribution of neuropathological investigation in various medical conditions, including anemic softening, arteriosclerosis, inflammation, infections, intoxications, injuries, degenerative diseases, tumors, and congenital malformations.
This book will be of use to neuropathologists and workers and researchers in the allied fields.

Gamma Knife Neurosurgery

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Today, over 500,000 patients have been treated world wide in 250 Gamma Knife Centres in 37 countries each one treating between 150 and 700 patients a year. The current book serves as a textbook, training manual and reference book for those involved in Gamma Knife practice covering the theoretical background, the practical aspects of treatment, the social side of the method and necessary information not only for users but for those who refer to the Gamma Knife. It also covers some aspects of the hospital and social administration required for optimal use of the technology, also looking at the effect of the internet on specialist medical practice. It also presents the completely new Gamma Knife (Perfexion), a new technology which extends the range of the Gamma Knife and will be the treatment standard for the future.

Training in Neurosurgery in the Countries of the EU

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Agreed standards and guidelines are the heart and soul of improving the differing training systems and to harmonize neurosurgical training in the European countries. Such standards and guidelines, as demanded by the politicians in a European directive, have been laid down in the European Training Charter of the UEMS (European Union of Medical Specialists) and been novellated recently. This book, written by experienced neurosurgeons, offers all those concerned with neurosurgical training – trainers and trainees – practical advice to implement the above mentioned standards and recommendations. It has been written as a manual: “How to do it”. It describes the tasks of a chairman (programme director), the tasks of the teaching staff, the organisation of a training curriculum, a rotation plan or a morbidity and mortality conference, the periodic progress evaluation, the course of an external audit and many more important topics. It contains a lot of practical tips, check lists and useful examples. Well educated young colleagues can best secure the future of our speciality and offer “safe neurosurgery ” to our patients.

Anatomical Dissections for Use in Neurosurgery

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advisabletoviewthesurfacestructuresofthebrainin able(theauthorstilldoessooccasionally)toorientate relationship to the skull, but then to start with re­ oneself on a formaldehyde-preserved brain. It is movingthebloodvesselsandleptomeningessothatin shownhowonaformaldehyde-preservedbrain,even this waythe skeletonizedorgan is dissected step by thoughitdoesnotprovidetherealconditionsofalive step, because in the preserved vascular system, the brainunderthe operative microscope, the most im­ structures are only partially recognizable and thus portant topographical relationships can be recog­ confusing. Forthisdissectiontwoorgansareneeded. nized. Inthe first dissection, thecerebrum andcerebellum Bothvolumesaretheresultofaone-yeardissection are studied. These the young neurosurgeon should course for colleagues meeting twice a week in our havebecomefamiliarduringhisinitialtraininginthe clinic.